Postal Customer Council Flyer - Data Protection Lunch and Learn on November 14

Metaverse Law to Speak at Postal Customer Council Lunch and Learn

Metaverse Law will be giving a zip talk and participating in a Q&A panel on Thursday, November 14 at the Phoenix Club in Anaheim, CA about Data Protection and Cyber Security.

The event itinerary includes registration at 11:00AM – 11:45AM, followed by lunch and a seminar which conclude at 1:30PM.

Registration details can be found at http://www.socalpcc.org/lock-it-or-lose-it.html.

Image of interconnected web of people

Website Accessibility for Privacy Policies – California Consumer Privacy Act Regulations

Image Credit: Gordon Johnson from Pixabay

On October 10, the California Attorney General released proposed guidelines to implement the California Consumer Protection Act (CCPA), which goes into effect in January 2020. One of the provisions that surprised many was a new requirement that privacy notices given to consumers “[b]e accessible to consumers with disabilities” and “[a]t a minimum, provide information on how a consumer with a disability may access the notice in an alternative format.” [Note: the AG’s regulations are not final, and interested parties may submit comments about them before December 6, 2019 at a series of public hearings, by mail, or by email.]

The requirement to provide the privacy notice in a format that is accessible to people with disabilities is consistent with recent trends towards website compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Whether out of a desire to advance equity or to comply with the spirit or letter of accessibility laws, we see more businesses and website operators making earnest attempts to make their websites accessible to the broadest audience possible.

Unfortunately, the AG did not provide very much guidance on how businesses could make their privacy notice or websites more accessible. Luckily, several organizations doing work in this area, including the W3 Web Accessibility InitiativeStanford Online Accessibility Program and Berkeley WebAccess, have put resources online for designers, developers and content creators.

While not exhaustive, the following is a list of fairly straightforward best practices distilled from other lists that businesses and website operators can implement to make their websites accessible to people with disabilities:

1.     Use headings correctly to organize the structure of your content

2.     Pay attention to color contrast

3.     Images should include alternate text in the markup/code; complex images should have more extensive descriptions near the image

4.     Provide transcripts for podcasts

5.     Websites with videos should provide visual access to the audio information through in-sync captioning

6.     Sites should consider using skiplinks

Millions of internet users have special needs, disabilities and impairments that make certain websites difficult or impossible to access and use. By designing your website with these challenges in mind, you can ensure that it is welcoming to as many users as possible.

Gold gavel on platform

California Attorney General Releases Proposed CCPA Regulations

Image Credit: 3D Animation Production Company from Pixabay

California Attorney Xavier Becerra unveiled highly-awaited regulations on October 10, 2019 to enforce the California Consumer Privacy Act, a sweeping new privacy law set to take effect on January 1, 2020.

The text of the CCPA proposed regulation is available here. As a few highlights, the proposed regulation:

  • Defines “categories of sources” and “categories of third parties” to include consumer data resellers, among other types of entities. This shows the Attorney General’s increased scrutiny on data brokers.
  • Requires privacy notices to “[b]e accessible to consumers with disabilities” and “[a]t a minimum, provide information on how a consumer with a disability may access the notice in an alternative format.” This is consistent with recent trends towards ADA website compliance.
  • Requires businesses to either (1) notify consumers of the sale of their data, if they collected the data from third party sources, or (2) confirm or receive signed attestations from the source describing how they provided a notice of collection.
  • Requires greater offline rights to notice and opt-outs of sale, for businesses that substantially interact with consumers offline.
  • Contemplates a button or logo opt-out in a modified version of the regulation.
  • Recognizes the security risks of providing specific pieces of information in response to a request, with requirements around verification of identity and security of transmission.

Individuals and businesses interested in shaping the final CCPA regulations can attend public hearings or send comments by mail or email to the following:

  • Email: PrivacyRegulations@doj.ca.gov
  • Privacy Regulations Coordinator
    California Office of the Attorney General
    300 South Spring Street, First Floor
    Los Angeles, CA 90013

The public hearing dates and locations are as follows:

Public Hearing DatesLocations
Sacramento
December 2, 2019
10:00 a.m.
CalEPA Building
Coastal Room, 2nd Floor
1001 I Street
Sacramento, CA 95814
Los Angeles
December 3, 2019
10:00 a.m.
Ronald Reagan Building
Auditorium, 1st Floor
300 S. Spring Street
Los Angeles, CA 90013
San Francisco
December 4, 2019
10:00 a.m.
Milton Marks Conference Center
Lower Level
455 Golden Gate Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94102
Fresno
December 5, 2019
10:00 a.m.
Fresno Hugh Burns Building
Assembly Room #1036
2550 Mariposa Mall
Fresno, CA 93721

More information about the public hearings and proposed CCPA regulation is available on the Attorney General’s CCPA website.

File folders with a small lock in the corner

Will the CCPA and Other State Privacy Laws Face Constitutional Attack?

Image Credit: Pettycon from Pixabay

This article is Part 2 of 3 in a series exploring proposed federal privacy laws and constitutional concerns of privacy laws in the United States. Part 3 will discuss the constitutional challenges facing a proposed federal privacy law. 

In the first part of this series, we examined several federal privacy bills proposed this year, as Congress eagerly tries to pass a single harmonizing federal law. The issue of preemption continues to divide Republican and Democrat lawmakers, however, with the former in favor of an express provision allowing preemption stricter state privacy laws such as the CCPA and the latter largely against such a provision. 

Regardless of whether a federal law passes, with an express preemption provision, state privacy laws are still at risk of constitutional attacks. There are two primary ways that a state privacy law may be challenged: (1) invalidation under the Dormant Commerce Clause, and (2) invalidation under First Amendment grounds. State legislators contemplating the passage of their own privacy laws will need to consider these constitutional issues in the drafting phase, or risk facing opposition on constitutional grounds.

Continue Reading Will the CCPA and Other State Privacy Laws Face Constitutional Attack?
Gold gavel on platform

Searching for the One Ring to Rule Them All: A Look at 8 U.S. Federal Privacy Bills

Image Credit: 3D Animation Production Company from Pixabay

This article is Part 1 of 2 in a series exploring proposed federal privacy laws in the United States. Part 2 will discuss the constitutional challenges facing not only a proposed federal privacy law but those facing existing state privacy laws as well.

As predicted in our Privacy Law Forecast for 2019, legislators have raced to introduce national privacy regulation in both the House and Senate this year.

In contrast to the European Union’s GDPR, a hodgepodge of sectoral laws govern privacy in specific industries: medical, financial, educational, and marketing sectors, among others. States have enacted laws to protect their residents. And on top of that, Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. § 45) grants authority to the FTC to enforce against unfair and deceptive acts and practices.

This all results in a confusing and burdensome “patchwork” of national, state and sectoral rules. (For more in-depth discussion on the current U.S. privacy regulatory landscape, please see American Privacy Laws in a Global Context.)

Given this regulatory environment, legislators are keen to put forth a single federal privacy law to standardize this “patchwork” and forestall the passage of dozens more state privacy bills. Some have set a deadline, hoping to pass a federal privacy law before the CCPA comes into effect on January 1, 2020. Since the start of 2019, lawmakers have introduced about 230 bills that regulate privacy in some way in either the House or Senate.

The following is a sample of comprehensive bills from both sides of the aisle. Though these bills are unlikely to pass committee, they indicate what policies lawmakers are considering in the current negotiations:

Continue Reading Searching for the One Ring to Rule Them All: A Look at 8 U.S. Federal Privacy Bills
1 2 3 4