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Metaverse Law Discusses GDPR and State Privacy Laws on KUCI 88.9 FM Privacy Piracy Radio

On Monday, June 25 at 8 A.M. Pacific, attorney Lily Li appeared as a guest star on KUCI 88.9 FM’s Privacy Piracy radio show. During the half-hour segment, Ms. Li discussed the impact of the recent General Data Protection Regulation, growing developments in state privacy regulation, and the California Consumer Privacy Act.

To listen to this broadcast, please click on the MP3 below.

KUCI 88.9 FM is a commercial free radio station, based out of the University of California – Irvine. For more information, see http://kuci.org/

Privacy Piracy is a half-hour public affairs radio show broadcasting on KUCI 88.9 FM. The show is co-hosted by attorney and privacy consultant Mari Frank and production engineer Lloyd Boshaw. For more information, see http://privacypiracy.org/

California Privacy Update: SB-1121 and the Consumer Privacy Act

As Californians gear up to vote in this week’s primary elections, the state’s businesses and voters should be aware of two separate privacy law developments: SB-1121 and the Consumer Privacy Act.

SB-1121 and Increased Liability for Data Breaches

On May 30, 2018, the California Senate recently voted to send SB-1121 to the state Assembly. The proposed amendment to the state’s current data breach laws (codified at Sections 1798.80-1798.84 of the Civil Code) would increase corporate liability for data breaches. The key provisions are as follows:

  • California “consumers,” not just “customers,” will be able to sue businesses under California’s data-breach protection laws. Under the existing rules, a California resident can only sue a business for a data breach if it provided information to the business for the purpose of buying products or services. This amendment would cover all businesses that maintain the personal data of California residents, regardless of the relationship between the business and the resident. The expansion of liability to consumers is in part responsive to the Equifax hack. In that situation, the credit agency reported that the records for about 148 million Americans were compromised, but very few of those people would be considered “customers” of Equifax.
  • California residents will be able to sue for a minimum of $200 in penalties per violation, without proof of consumer injury. This poses the risk of large-scale consumer class actions, for even minor data breaches, even where no one was harmed by the breach.
  • SB-1121 sets a 4-year statute of limitations “from the time the person discovered, or, through the exercise of reasonable diligence, should have discovered” a data privacy violation.Continue Reading California Privacy Update: SB-1121 and the Consumer Privacy Act
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